Women Veteran’s Updates

The Clemente Course in the Humanities Women Veteran Initiative

Hosted by Veterans First Ltd.

Women Veteran Initiative Goal

Create a “Bridge to Achievement” by strengthening the habits of reflection and critical thinking of our Women Veterans so they are better able to manage the direction of their lives, engage effectively in society and in actions to empower themselves and strive to improve our Nation and communities through civic engagement.

Provides free, accredited college courses in the humanities to those marginalized by economic hardship and adverse circumstances. Students are guided by highly experienced college faculty who, using the Socratic method, provide a rigorous education in literature, philosophy, American history, art history, and critical thinking and writing. Class discussions and readings increase students’ skills in critical thinking, writing, communication, time management, teamwork, and self advocacy. There are currently 25 Clemente Courses in the US, and at a minimum, each Course enrolls 20­25 students per year for a one semester course. Fifteen of the current courses are accredited by Bard College, and ten receive credit from local colleges and universities.

There is no tuition for qualified students. Books and all course materials are provided, and the college credits offered through a partnership – primarily with Bard College, but also with other colleges and universities – are readily transferable to other institutions. In addition to free tuition and books, access to childcare and transportation is provided without charge. Courses meet two evenings a week for 6­8 months depending upon the length of the class meetings. There are no tests or grades. Students are granted college credit based on attendance, classroom engagement, and their satisfactory completion of written assignments. (Generally there are two papers and one revision assigned in each discipline.) Six to twelve credits are granted, depending upon whether the college granting the credits works on a semester or quarter system

Contact Joan at: 602-841-7663 Ÿ  www.veteransfirstltd.org

Reference attached Clemente Course Description.

CCH Pkg

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WomenVetsUSA for Women

Connections: Click, Call, Commute

If you are a woman with military experience or care for or about someone who is, you are just a click, call or commute away from a wealth of resources.

24/7 Emergency Numbers

Women Veterans Call Center

  • 1-855-VA-WOMEN / 1-855-829-6636
    Hours of Operation:
    Mon-Fri 8:00 AM-10:00 PM, EST
    Saturday 8:00 AM-6:30 PM, EST

https://www.womenvetsusa.org/index.php

 

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VA’s Center for Women Veterans Partners with the Center for American Women and Politics

The Department of Veterans Affairs’ (VA) Center for Women Veterans (Center) entered into a memorandum of agreement (MoA) with the Center for American Women and Politics (CAWP), a unit of the Eagleton Institute of Politics at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, to increase women Veterans’ leadership and career opportunities, which will benefit the Nation’s workforce and address women Veterans growing needs.

The MoA will allow the Center and CAWP to leverage existing resources and increase coordination of activities to help women Veterans develop public service and community engagement skill sets, so they will be prepared for public and community service opportunities.

“Women Veterans often contact us for information about how they can continue serving,” says Elisa M. Basnight, Director of the Center for Women Veterans.  “This MoA with the Center for American Women and Politics presents a prime opportunity for the Center to help prepare them for other forms of public service as it responds to a persistent need women Veterans tell us they have, which is the desire to continue to make a difference after the uniform.”

The Center, created in 1994 to monitor VA’s administration of benefits and services to women Veterans and to advise the Secretary on VA policy’s impact on Women Veterans, can provide advice to CAWP’s on how it focuses its resource information to address women Veterans’ issues.

CAWP is a source of scholarly research and current data about American women’s political participation.   Its mission is to promote greater knowledge and understanding about women’s participation in politics and government and to enhance women’s influence and leadership in public life.

“The Center for American Women and Politics is delighted to collaborate with the Center for Women Veterans to provide more information and resources for women Veterans who want to engage more fully in their communities. Women who have already put their country first by serving in the military are exactly the people we need as public leaders,” said Debbie Walsh, Director of the Center for American Women and Politics.

Women Veterans represent one of the fastest growing segments of the Veterans population—about 10 percent of the total 22 million Veterans in this country.  Today there are an estimated 2.2 million female Veterans.  The Center for Women Veterans participates in collaborative initiatives with Federal/state/local governmental and non-governmental stakeholders, to improve opportunities for women Veterans.

For more information about women Veterans, visit www.va.gov/womenvet.

Veterans With Incomplete Health Care Applications Receive Additional Year to Enroll

WASHINGTON – The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) announced today it will extend the healthcare enrollment application period for one year to approximately 545,000 living Veterans that have pending incomplete enrollment applications.

“Fixing the Veterans enrollment system is a top priority for VA. This is an important step forward to regain Veterans’ trust and improve access to care as we continue the MyVA Transformation,” said VA Deputy Secretary Sloan D. Gibson. “We’ve got a lot of work left to do, but this is a big step in the right direction to restore the data integrity of our enrollment system,” Gibson said.

The National Enrollment Improvement team conducted a detailed analysis of the pending applications in VA’s enrollment system and identified approximately 545,000 living Veterans whose applications were incomplete and in a pending status.  The team also validated that approximately 288,000 pending enrollment system records were for deceased Veterans. VA has segregated deceased records from living Veteran records and, as part of the Veteran Enrollment Rework Project (VERP), will review each incomplete application to determine if any should have been enrolled in VA health care.

VA is required by law to provide notice to Veterans of incomplete applications. The VERP team could not verify that VA’s mailing system used to contact Veterans about their incomplete applications was able to notify the 545,000 Veterans identified above.

VA will contact living Veterans to confirm their continued interest in enrolling in VA health care and ask them for the necessary information to complete their application.  Veterans will have one year from the notice to provide this information.  After a year, VA will close the record.  A Veteran may reapply for enrollment at any time.

As  Veterans choose to enroll, VA offers an enchancement to their enrollment experience through “Welcome to VA” (W2VA).  Veterans enrolled since July 1, 2015 have received a personal introduction to VA health care services, programs and resources to help them become more familiar with VA’s services. In addition, VA sends each new enrollee an introductory letter and personalized handbook in the mail. W2VA enhances communication by reaching out to newly enrolled Veterans through personal phone calls upon enrollment, providing assistance with health care inquiries and assisting with their initial appointment at their preferred VA healthcare facility.

3/2016

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Los Angeles Sentinel: VA Honors Waters for Commitment to Women’s Veterans (11 December, 14)

 

The Department of Veterans’ Affairs (VA) has honored Congresswoman Maxine Waters (CA-43) for her years of work on behalf of America’s women veterans.

In a ceremony that took place in Washington, D.C., Waters was honored by VA Secretary Bob McDonald for her work in creating the Center for Women Veterans, a special bureau within the VA that advocates for women veterans by ensuring health care benefits and other programs are effectively meeting women’s needs.

The event was to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Center’s founding. To mark the occasion, Waters participated in a ceremony with McDonald, Center Director Elisa Basnight, and former directors Irene Trowell-Harris, Joan Furey, and Dr. Susan Mather.

“Ranking Member Maxine Waters is the true matriarch of the Center for Women Veterans. It was her work back in 1994 that made the Center a long-overdue reality,” said VA Secretary Robert McDonald.

“After being elected to Congress, one of my first priorities was to introduce legislation that ensured women veterans were informed of their benefits and receiving appropriate care at the VA. And 20 years later, I am so proud to see how the Center has affected change,” said Waters.

By the year 2000, the Center had influenced the VA to provide prenatal and obstetrical care to women veterans. That same year, the VA announced a $3 million dollar investment to lift women veterans out of homelessness, an investment closely followed by Congress enacting legislation to care for children with birth defects born to women veterans of the Vietnam War.

The Center has also connected female veterans with public and community service opportunities, while also ensuring the service and contributions of women Veterans and women in the military are properly recognized by our nation and society.”

Before the Center was created, there was a shocking inequality for women veterans trying to access VA benefits. A 1982 report found women were not receiving proper physical examinations at VA facilities. There was no access to basic gynecological care – a serious problem which contributed to women suffering a cancer rate twice that of women in the general population, with gynecological cancers being the most common.  And a shocking 57 percent of female veterans did not even know they were eligible for VA services, benefits, and programs.

Acknowledging this problem, in 1993, Waters spearheaded legislation to create a special bureau for women at the VA. That legislation was enacted into law in 1994, creating the Center for Women Veterans to address these problems. As a member of the Veterans’ Affairs Committee, Waters fought to ensure that the creation of the Center was included as part of the “Veterans’ Benefits Improvements Act of 1994,” enacted to provide for veterans of the Persian Gulf War.

Waters added, “Twenty years later, the Center is needed more than ever.  Women are the fastest growing population within the DOD and VA. And they still face challenges – like a broken grievance system that forces them out of service more often than it holds predators accountable.  I believe that in the future, the Center can take a leadership role in ensuring victims of sexual assault are provided access to the important services they need. And we all must act boldly to offer these victims a path to justice, so that they may come forward without fear.”

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Do We Know What All These Abbreviations Mean? Take a Look!

–A–

ADVS-  Arizona Department of Veterans Services
AML-  American Legion
AMVETS – American Veterans

–B–

–C—

CBOC VA – Community Based Outreach Clinics (Medical Clinics)

–D—

DAV – Disabled American Veterans
DHHS – Department of Health and Human Services
DOL – Department of Labor
DOA – Department of Administration

–E–

EXPOW – Ex-Prisoners of War

–F–

–G—

GSW – Gold Star Wives (Wives of Deceased Veterans)

–H–

HUD – Housing and Urban Development
HUD-VASH  – Housing Vouchers for Rent

–I–

–J–

JWV – Jewish War Veterans

–K–

–L–

–M–

MFRF – Arizona Military Family Relief Fund
MOPH – Military Order of Purple Heart
MCL – Marine Corps League
MOAA – Military Officers Assoc. of America
MST – Military Sexual Trauma – Sexual assault or repeated, threatening sexual harassment that occurred while the Veteran was in the military. It includes any sexual activity where someone is involved against her or his will.

–N–

NABV – National Assoc. of Black Veterans
NVOA – National Veteran Organization Association
NCOA – National Assoc. of Non Commissioned Officers
NSO – National Service Offices

–O–

OEF – Operation Enduring Freedom (Afghanistan)
OIF – Operation Iraqi Freedom (Iraq)

–P–

PAV –  Paralyzed American Veterans
PTSD – Post Traumatic Stress Disorder – Is an anxiety disorder that can occur after experiencing a traumatic event.

–Q–

–R–

–S—

SSVF – Supportive Service for Veterans Families

–T—

TAP – Transition Assistance Program
TDIU – Totally disabled
TBI – Traumatic Brain Injury  – Occurs when a sudden trauma, such as a blow or jolt to the head, causes damage to the brain.

–U–

USA – United States Army
USMC – United States Marine Corps
USN – United States Navy
USAF – United States Air Force
USCG – United States Coast Guard
USNG – United States National Guard
USANG – United States Army National Guard
ANG – United States Air National Guard

–V–

VFW  – Veterans of Foreign Wars
VA  – Veterans Affairs
VHA – Veterans Health Administration
VAMC – Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center
VVA – Vietnam Veterans Association
VSO’s – Veteran Service Organizations
VMLC – Veteran Medical Leadership Council
VR&E – Vocational Rehabilitation and Education
VISN – Veteran Integrated Service Network (VA separates the US into 22 VISN’s)

–W–

WMA – Women Marine Association
WAC – Women’s Army Corps
WWI – World War I
WWII – World War II

–X–

–Y–

–Z—

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VA’s Center for Women Veterans Partners with the Center for American Women and Politics

The Department of Veterans Affairs’ (VA) Center for Women Veterans (Center) entered into a memorandum of agreement (MoA) with the Center for American Women and Politics (CAWP), a unit of the Eagleton Institute of Politics at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, to increase women Veterans’ leadership and career opportunities, which will benefit the Nation’s workforce and address women Veterans growing needs.

The MoA will allow the Center and CAWP to leverage existing resources and increase coordination of activities to help women Veterans develop public service and community engagement skill sets, so they will be prepared for public and community service opportunities.

“Women Veterans often contact us for information about how they can continue serving,” says Elisa M. Basnight, Director of the Center for Women Veterans.  “This MoA with the Center for American Women and Politics presents a prime opportunity for the Center to help prepare them for other forms of public service as it responds to a persistent need women Veterans tell us they have, which is the desire to continue to make a difference after the uniform.”

The Center, created in 1994 to monitor VA’s administration of benefits and services to women Veterans and to advise the Secretary on VA policy’s impact on Women Veterans, can provide advice to CAWP’s on how it focuses its resource information to address women Veterans’ issues.

CAWP is a source of scholarly research and current data about American women’s political participation.   Its mission is to promote greater knowledge and understanding about women’s participation in politics and government and to enhance women’s influence and leadership in public life.

“The Center for American Women and Politics is delighted to collaborate with the Center for Women Veterans to provide more information and resources for women Veterans who want to engage more fully in their communities. Women who have already put their country first by serving in the military are exactly the people we need as public leaders,” said Debbie Walsh, Director of the Center for American Women and Politics.

Women Veterans represent one of the fastest growing segments of the Veterans population—about 10 percent of the total 22 million Veterans in this country.  Today there are an estimated 2.2 million female Veterans.  The Center for Women Veterans participates in collaborative initiatives with Federal/state/local governmental and non-governmental stakeholders, to improve opportunities for women Veterans.

For more information about women Veterans, visit www.va.gov/womenvet.